Sentence and Phrase Endings

Sentences and phrases are most often ended with a termination of some kind.  These terminations are often different for male and female speakers.

 

Declarative sentences are usually completed with “ke” (kay) for a male speaker and “ki” (kee) for a female speaker.  These are for statements of fact.  For example, “It is raining,” or “I don’t like it,” would be appropriate uses for ke/ki.  This termination is not always used but leaving it out can suggest the possibility that the statement might be a question (see below).  Though it does not literally say it, the termination ke/ki often carries the sense of “it is.”

 

Questions are usually completed with “je” (jeh) for a male speaker and “ja” (jah) for a female speaker.  This termination is often omitted because not ending a phrase with ke/ki suggests the possibility that the sentence is a question.

 

Imperatives (commands) are expressed three different ways with each one having a male and female version.  Below are the imperatives in order of intensity.

 

Polite form:

ho (hoh) – male speaker

ha (hah) – female speaker

This version is comparable to the idea of “please” in the sense of telling someone “Please sit down.”  While still expressed as a command, the speaker is being polite about it.

 

Regular command:

re (ray) – male and female speaker
(The female version of this termination pronounces the “e” as the “a” in “apple”.)

 

Intense command:

gare (GAH-ray) – male and female speaker
(The female version of this termination also pronounces the “e” as the “a” in apple”.)

 

Exhortative statements in Otoe-Missouria convey the English idea of “let’s”.  This is expressed with “to” (toh) for a male speaker and “ta” (tah) for a female speaker.

Statements where the speaker is expressing uncertainty or does not know what they are saying to be a fact (hearsay for example), the statement is ended with “asgų” (AH-sgooⁿ) for both male and female speakers.